Rowland Ward Antique Diorama of full mount Leucistic (colour morph) Badger (Meles Meles). Species preconvention 01/06/1947 can be commercialised in accordance with rule n°338/97 CE dated 09/12/1996.

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Rowland Ward Antique Diorama of full mount Leucistic (colour morph) Badger (Meles Meles). Species preconvention 01/06/1947 can be commercialised in accordance with rule n°338/97 CE dated 09/12/1996.
Rowland Ward Antique Diorama of full mount Leucistic (colour morph) Badger (Meles Meles). Species preconvention 01/06/1947 can be commercialised in accordance with rule n°338/97 CE dated 09/12/1996.
Rowland Ward Antique Diorama of full mount Leucistic (colour morph) Badger (Meles Meles). Species preconvention 01/06/1947 can be commercialised in accordance with rule n°338/97 CE dated 09/12/1996.
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Rowland Ward Antique Diorama of full mount Leucistic (colour morph) Badger (Meles Meles). Species preconvention 01/06/1947 can be commercialised in accordance with rule n°338/97 CE dated 09/12/1996.
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Rowland Ward Antique Diorama of full mount Leucistic (colour morph) Badger (Meles Meles). Species preconvention 01/06/1947 can be commercialised in accordance with rule n°338/97 CE dated 09/12/1996.
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Rowland Ward Antique Diorama of full mount Leucistic (colour morph) Badger (Meles Meles). Species preconvention 01/06/1947 can be commercialised in accordance with rule n°338/97 CE dated 09/12/1996.
Tax included.

The badger is an omnivorous mammal with short legs for digging. He has an elongated, weasel-like head with small ears. This specimen is a European badger or Meles meles and is bigger than his American counterparts. The female badger in the showcase has a deviation in its pigmentation, which the light spots on its coat can notice. Such an animal with partial loss of pigmentation is called leucistic. Unlike people with albinism who have no pigmentation, leucistic badgers don't have red eyes but black ones.

The taxidermist who handled the animal was James Rowland Ward (London, 1848-1912). He learned the trade from his father and opened his own company, "Rowland Ward Limited" in London. He mainly made a name for himself with his taxidermy birds and large animal trophies. But he was all-around and also designed furniture with animal parts. Today one can also read natural history publications by his hand. The small label at the bottom lest of the display case gives away the origin of the animal, namely Hampshire Farm. The ensemble can be dated around 1920.

Dimensions 60cm x 85cm x 40cm